atsrac logoAging Transport Systems Rulemaking Advisory Committee



Aging Transport Systems Advisory Committee Terms of Reference

Background

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has developed the Aging Non-Structural Systems Plan to address the recommendation of the White House Commission on Aviation Internal of Exposed AirplaneSafety and Security (WHCSS) that: In cooperation with airlines and manufacturers, the FAA's Aging Aircraft program should be expanded to cover non-structural systems. Throughout this Term of Reference the words "aging non-structural systems" and "aging systems" will be used interchangeably.

The Commission was concerned that existing procedures, directives, quality assurance, and inspections may not be sufficient to prevent safety related problems caused by corrosion and other deteriorating effects on nonstructural components of commercial aircraft as they age.

As part of its recommendations, the Commission recommended that the FAA work with airlines and manufacturers to expand the aging airplane program to include nonstructural components through steps including:full and complete tear-downs of selected aircraft scheduled to go out of service; the establishment of a lead-the-fleet research program; an expansion of the FAA-DOD-NASA cooperative aging aircraft program; an expansion of programs of the Airworthiness Assurance Working Group to include nonstructural components; and encouraging the development of modern technical means to ensure and predict the continued airworthiness of aging nonstructural components and systems.

In order to fully address the WHCSS recommendations on aging systems, an Aging Nonstructural Systems Study team was formed. This team, led by the Transport Airplane Directorate (TAD), conducted an inspection of systems in several aging airplanes met with FAA Principal Maintenance Inspectors (PMI) who are tasked with oversight of major air carriers in order to make a preliminary evaluation of the need for additional work to address the Commission's concerns. The team concluded that additional work is warranted and that industry involvement in this work is essential.

The FAA has chosen to address these recommendations through an Administrator's Advisory Committee as the most appropriate way to provide a forum for the parties involved in addressing the WHCSS recommendations.

The elements of the aging systems plan have been grouped into five major tasks, each incorporating one or more related elements of the plan. Rather than provide separate tasking statements for each major task, the five major tasks are addressed below. This makes it easy to refer to related plan elements in other major tasks and serves to clarify the way in which the plan elements interact. Each major task description begins with a specific task statement giving the overall aim of the task, then identifies the separate subtasks, the schedules to be met, the proposed work assignments, contacts, and, where appropriate, a list of applicable rules and guidance to which changes should be recommended.

SPECIFIC TASK 1

SAMPLING INSPECTION OF THE FLEET

Conduct an in-depth survey of the condition of aging transport airplane fleet systems and make model-specific safety recommendations related to airplane systems that will eliminate or significantly reduce the hazards associated with the types of age-related damage displayed by the fleet. Propose mandatory actions to address in-service airplanes. Recommend changes to certification and operations rules to address problems associated with aging. There are four subtasks to this effort.

1.1) Airplane Models to be Evaluated:

Establish the airplane models to be evaluated. A representative sample of each design in the fleet, i.e. 727, A300, for which individual airplanes have exceeded the design life should be evaluated, as well as newer airplanes incorporating full authority electronic flight and engine controls. Identify the systems to be evaluated on each model based on criticality and service experience. Consider evaluating airplanes with a range of ages for each model type to determine the onset of significant aging effects and the safety significance of those effects.

1.2) Criteria for Evaluation:
Establish the criteria for evaluation. Evaluation criteria should reflect the level of system criticality, the types of aging phenomena observed by the FAA in the preliminary study reported as part of the Transport Nonstructural Systems Plan, the types of aging effects which could be important for critical systems, fleet service history, and DOD/NASA "lessons learned" pertaining to airplane maintenance practice. Include review of non-critical systems whose failure could adversely affect critical systems, i.e. fire damage to or short circuit to adjacent wiring or components. Aging phenomena which might affect lightning and High Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) protection should be addressed as well as more direct aging phenomena such as wire insulation degradation, connector corrosion, contamination, etc. Specific areas where damage/contamination is likely such as wheel wells, under lavatory areas, etc., should be identified.

1.3) Evaluation Plan:
Develop a plan for the evaluation phase and submit it for FAA approval within 6 months of tasking. The plan should include the information referred to in 1 and 2 above. The FAA will consider the plan and may make changes as necessary to satisfy agency goals.

1.4) Fleet Evaluation:
Complete the evaluations in accordance with the plan as modified and approved by the FAA and submit findings and recommendations to the FAA within 12 months of FAA approval of the evaluation plan. Make recommendations for actions for the in-service fleet, including corrective regulatory actions that will eliminate, significantly reduce, or control the hazards associated with aging systems effects in accordance with the requirements of FAR 25.1309. In the event that evaluations reveal conditions which could exist on newer airplane designs such as the Boeing 757/767 and Airbus A320/330/340, recommend additional inspections to determine the condition of these newer airplanes.

Schedule for Task 1: The activities of Task 1 will be completed within the times specified. The FAA will consider the recommendations produced by the Aging Transport Systems Advisory Committee and initiate future FAA regulatory action. However, if the group is unable to provide the FAA with the products identified above within the specified times, the FAA will take other action to assure the prompt completion of the tasks.

Proposed Advisory Committee Work Assignment for Task 1: The Air Transport Association (ATA) has organized an Aging Systems Task Force to begin industry efforts to evaluate the systems of the current air transport fleet. We recommend this group be chartered as a working group under the Aging Transport Systems Advisory Committee to accomplish this task. Augmentation of the working group to address airplanes not included in the ATA fleet and to include other interested parties would be necessary.

Contacts for Task 1:

FAA: Stewart Miller (425) 227-2190
JAA: TBD
U.S. Industry: TBD
European Industry: TBD

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SPECIFIC TASK 2

REVIEW OF FLEET SERVICE HISTORY

Review service history, manufacturer's service bulletins, manufacturer's service letters, and applicable Airworthiness Directives for the aging transport fleet. Identify information which pertains to aging systems for possible mandatory action. The fleet to be reviewed should be the same as evaluated as part of the fleet evaluation program of Specific Task 1. There are three subtasks.

2.1) Criteria for Mandatory Action on Service Data:
Establish the criteria for selection of service data for mandatory action. Evaluation criteria should reflect the level of system criticality, the criticality of the failure modes reported in the service data or service history, the potential for fire or other system damage, and the potential for presentation of misleading information to the crew. Problems which might affect lightning and High Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) protection should be addressed as well as more direct failure modes. Specific areas where damage/contamination is likely such as wheel wells, under lavatory areas, etc., should be identified and particular attention paid to service experience and service data regarding these areas. Identify aging fleet service experience and service data which may be precursors of problems which may develop in newer airplanes.

2.2) Review of Existing Airworthiness Directives:
Review any Airworthiness Directives that require repetitive inspections, and determine if continued inspections are warranted, or if a terminating action is appropriate.

2.3) Review of Service Data and Service Experience:
Complete the reviews of service experience and service data, submit findings and make recommendations to the FAA within 18 months of tasking. Make recommendations for possible mandatory corrective actions for the in-service aging fleet that will eliminate, significantly reduce, or control the hazards associated with aging systems effects to the level required by FAR 25.1309. Make recommendations for studies of newer airplanes when precursor data indicates the potential for problems.

Schedule for Task 2: This activity is to be completed within 18 months of tasking. The FAA will consider the recommendations produced by the Aging Transport Systems Advisory Committee and initiate appropriate FAA regulatory action. If the group is unable to provide the FAA with the products identified above within the specified times, the FAA will take other action to assure the prompt completion of the task.

Proposed Advisory Committee Work Assignment: The Air Transport Association (ATA) has organized an Aging Systems Task Force to begin industry efforts to evaluate the systems of the current air transport fleet. We recommend this group be chartered as a working group under the Aging Transport Systems Advisory Committee to accomplish this task along with its aging airplane evaluation task. Augmentation of the working group to address airplanes not in the ATA fleet and to include other interested parties will be necessary.

Contacts for Task 2:

FAA: Stewart Miller (425) 227-2190
JAA: TBD
US Industry: TBD
European Industry: TBD

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SPECIFIC TASK 3

IMPROVEMENT OF MAINTENANCE CRITERIA

Maintenance procedures currently in use in the air transport industry may not adequately or proactively address aging nonstructural systems. While it is not expected that this advisory committee will define airplane model specific detailed maintenance activities, there is a need to define general criteria for maintenance and inspection activities which maintenance programs should exhibit to address aging systems issues. This task is therefore to improve general maintenance criteria for airplane systems to assure aging systems related problems are identified and corrected. This should be done by developing enhancements to the maintenance planning procedures, maintenance procedures, inspection procedures, inspection criteria, procedures for protection of systems during maintenance, and maintenance training programs to ensure that aging systems issues are adequately addressed. These enhancements, when applied to a specific airplane type, should lead to development of an airplane model specific maintenance program which adequately addresses aging systems issues. There are five subtasks.

3.1) Review and Revise Maintenance Steering Group (MSG)-3 Processes:
Revise Maintenance Steering Group (MSG)-3 processes to address catastrophic events associated with wire failures as MSG-3 review items. The revised processes should result in identification of wire and system failures which are catastrophic or reduce the ability of the crew to cope with adverse operating conditions; or which can induce these effects on other systems with which they are associated, either physically or functionally; and identification of maintenance tasks, inspection thresholds, and inspection intervals for failures with catastrophic consequences. Failures of components which could negatively affect HIRF, lightning protection, and electromagnetic compatibility features should be addressed. The MSG-3 process is to be updated by July, 2000, with maintenance programs updated as necessary by October, 2000.

3.2) Define Improved Inspection Criteria:
Define improved inspection criteria for wiring, connectors, and associated components using ATA best practices, i.e. ATA Specification 117, Wiring Maintenance Practice Guidelines, pertinent manufacturer's service data, and DOD/NASA "lessons learned" pertaining to airplane maintenance practice. Wire in conduits or the interior of large wire bundles is not inspectable under the current "general visual inspection" definition. Further there are many areas in the airplane where it is difficult to see and fully inspect even the surface of wire bundles. Evaluate the current definition of "general visual inspection" and determine if it is still appropriate to wire and wire systems. An expected result of this review would be the incorporation of inspections, improved maintenance practices, improved definitions, or other actions to detect potentially catastrophic electrical faults. Include inspection criteria for components whose failure might negatively affect HIRF, lightning protection, and electromagnetic compatibility features. Give particular consideration to the results of changes to MSG-3 activities identified in subtask 3.1 above. The inspections, improved maintenance practices, improved definitions, guidance or other actions to detect potentially catastrophic electrical faults are to be developed and published by January, 2000, and should be incorporated in the work of Task 5.

3.3) Define Practices to Eliminate Wire Bundle Contamination During Maintenance:
Establish improved maintenance practices to prevent contamination of wiring and connectors with metal shavings or other harmful solids or fluids during maintenance of other components or modifications and repairs of airplane structure. Include those practices in appropriate maintenance instructions and training. The practices are to be prepared in the form of guidance material by January, 2000, and should be incorporated in the work of Task 5.

3.4) Define Acceptance Criteria for Corrosion of Systems Components:
Define acceptance criteria for corrosion on flight control actuators, associated linkages, and hydraulic fittings, if they do not already exist in maintenance documents. Define limits for corrosion on these components based on manufacturer's service data, service history, and DOD/NASA "lessons learned". Provide recommendations to the FAA as to the acceptance criteria and on the means of incorporating these criteria into maintenance programs. Consider revision of the MSG 3 documents and process to reflect lessons learned. Recommendations are to be provided by January, 2000, and should be incorporated in the work of Task 5.

3.5) Present maintenance practices often do not relate the results of maintenance activities on components removed and replaced during line maintenance to the original service problem. Propose a process to assure that components removed during maintenance are examined for safety implications of the observed failures and the results are tracked back to the original service problem.

Schedule for Task 3: This activity will be tasked for the times specified. The FAA will consider the recommendations produced by the Advisory Committee and incorporate them in appropriate guidance material or reference them as appropriate. However, if the group is unable to provide the FAA with the products identified above within the specified times, the FAA will take other action to assure the prompt completion of the tasks.

Proposed Advisory Committee Work Assignment: It is proposed that this task be assigned to a working group under the Aging Transport Systems Advisory Committee

Contacts for Task 3:

FAA: Fred Sobeck (202) 267-7355
JAA: TBD
US Industry: TBD
European Industry: TBD

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SPECIFIC TASK 4

REVIEW AND UPDATE STANDARD PRACTICES FOR WIRING

The Air Transport Association (ATA) has developed a specification for maintenance manuals for aircraft. In this document, Chapter 20 contains a section on "Standard Practices for Wiring". In support of the ATA specification the manufacturers of aircraft develop a version of Chapter 20 which identifies data and procedures regarding each type of wiring component throughout the aircraft which has been approved for installation. Data from each product vendor is included. At any individual airline or repair station only part of this information is needed. The remainder of the manufacturer's Chapter 20 material has the potential for confusing the maintenance personnel, so the material should be tailored to the specific requirement of each airline or repair station. There are two subtasks.

4.1) Define Standards:
Define standards for a simplified Chapter 20 to be created by the user organization and based on the manufacturer's omnibus Chapter 20, Standard Practices for Wiring. Propose a standard method of developing such simplified documents through a working group involving the manufacturer and the airline, basing the document on the ATA specification. Define operator specific information which should be developed, such as "standard repairs" developed by the airline because of operator specific problems. Consider appending this material to ATA Specification 100.

4.2) Define a Process of Training Development:
Define a process for training development based on the airline's customized Chapter 20. This training process should be in a format that is easily assimilated into training for repair station, air carrier and non-air carrier operations. This work should be integrated with the work of Task 5.

Schedule for Task 4: This activity is to be tasked for completion in two phases. By December, 1999, establish the preliminary set of requirements. By March, 2000 complete publication of the first update to guidance material. The FAA will consider the recommendations produced by the Advisory Committee and incorporate them in appropriate guidance material or reference them as appropriate. However, if the group is unable to provide the FAA with the products identified above within the specified times, the FAA will take other action to assure the prompt completion of the tasks.

Proposed Advisory Committee Work Assignment: It is proposed that this task be assigned to a working group under the Aging Transport Systems Advisory Committee

Contacts for Task 4:

FAA: Fred Sobeck (202) 267-7355
JAA: TBD
US Industry: TBD
European Industry: TBD

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SPECIFIC TASK 5

REVIEW AIR CARRIER AND REPAIR STATION INSPECTION AND REPAIR TRAINING PROGRAMS AND RECOMMEND ACTIONS TO ADDRESS AGING SYSTEMS:

Review air carrier and repair station training programs for nonstructural systems inspection and repair to ensure that they adequately address aging wiring system components (wire, connectors, brackets, shielding, clamps, ground) and other nonstructural systems. Incorporate the work of Tasks 1 through 4 as it applies to training.

5.1) Define Desired Attributes of Training Programs:
Define desirable attributes of training programs for nonstructural systems inspection and repair based on experience; wiring "best practices" guides; aircraft and component manufacturers', DOD, NASA, or other government agency recommended practices; and other pertinent data.

5.2) Define Model Inspection and Repair Training Programs:
Define model inspection and repair training programs which reflect the desirable attributes defined in 5.1 and which incorporate the improvements in maintenance and inspection processes developed by the advisory committee in Tasks 1 through 4. These model programs should be easily adapted to specific airplane types. Specific areas to be considered include improved wire and component inspection criteria including corrosion criteria, MSG-3 changes, maintenance practices to reduce wire bundle contamination, and improved maintenance and inspection criteria for system components aimed at lightning, HIRF, and electromagnetic compatibility protection.

Schedule for Task 5: Develop a plan for definition of desirable attributes and definition of model programs within 6 months of tasking. The FAA will consider the plan and may make changes as necessary to satisfy agency goals. Complete the definition of model maintenance and inspection programs and submit findings and recommendations to the FAA by November, 1999. The FAA will consider the recommendations produced by the Aging Transport Systems Advisory Committee and initiate future FAA regulatory action. However, if the group is unable to provide the FAA with the products identified above within the specified times, the FAA will take other action to assure the prompt completion of the tasks.

Proposed Advisory Committee Work Assignment: It is proposed that this task be assigned to a training working group under the advisory committee.

Contacts For Task 5:

FAA: Fred Sobeck (202) 267-7355
JAA: TBD
US Industry: TBD
European Industry: TBD

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wiresTASK 6

WIRE SYSTEM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

TASK 6.1: Establish a Harmonization Working Group (HWG)

ATSRAC is tasked to establish a Wire System Harmonization Working Group (HWG) to provide a report to the FAA that will include response and recommendations to the following tasking statements. The FAA will use this report as the basis to develop a new part 25 regulation addressing the certification requirements for wire systems and any associated guidance. The Wire System HWG, should be established as a part 25 / JAR-25 Harmonization Working Group, and be comprised of, as a minimum, representatives from:

  • type certificate and supplemental type certificate holders,
  • operators, and
  • regulatory authorities.

TASK 6.2: Develop a Coordination Process with ARAC

The Wire System HWG should establish working methods to ensure proper coordination with the ARAC Electrical Systems HWG and the Systems Design & Analysis HWG, who are addressing related subjects. Methods of coordination may include:

  • cross-membership
  • joint meetings
  • systematic exchange of documents
  • ARAC review of recommendations

TASK 6.3: Develop a Coordination Process with other ATSRAC Working Groups

In developing the report for wire system certification requirements, the Wire System HWG must coordinate with:

  • Standard Wire Practices Manual HWG (addressing TASK 7)
  • Enhanced Maintenance Practices for Systems HWG (addressing TASK 9)

Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked to develop a process for coordination between these working groups.

TASK 6.4: Combine Current Wire System Regulations into One Section

Current requirements for the certification of wire systems from connector to connector (including other terminating devices, such as terminal blocks, terminal lugs, modules, etc.) are contained in various paragraphs throughout part 25. (Circuit Protection Devices will not be addressed) This reduces the visibility of the requirements and does not facilitate a comprehensive process for the design and certification of wire systems. Therefore, to raise the awareness of wire system certification, ATSRAC is tasked to review all 14 CFR part 25 and JAR-25 paragraphs related to wiring systems, as well as all ATSRAC and ARAC recommendations related to wiring systems. Following this review, ATSRAC is tasked to submit recommendations for combining the existing paragraphs and creating a new section dedicated specifically to wire systems.

TASK 6.5: Identify Design Requirements to Mitigate Problems of Aging in Wire Systems

ATSRAC recommendations have identified aging characteristics of wire systems and methods to mitigate the effects of aging. Certain design practices have been recognized as a means to mitigate potential problems due to "aging." Consideration should be given to enhance certification by requiring that new wire system designs include these means of mitigation. Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked to identify requirements for a new wire systems rule on how to account for aging effects in the certification of wire systems. These new requirements must consider the conclusions and recommendations contained in the ATSRAC recommendations of Chapter 7 of the Intrusive Inspection Report, as well as other ATSRAC recommendations.

TASK 6.6: Identify Requirements for Wire System Safety Assessments

Historically, the wiring associated with a certain system has been included in the safety assessment of that system. Failures of the wiring and components were typically considered solely on the end effect to that system. However, the failure of the wire system at an airplane level has not been given consistent consideration.

Service history and the recommendations from ATSRAC have shown that wire systems failures often affect multiple systems within a particular zone. Current safety assessment practices, as identified in Advisory Circular (AC) 25.1309-1A, "System Design Analysis," provide methods to address these types of failures. Performing these safety assessments to show compliance with § 25.1309 ("Equipment, systems, and installations") may be necessary to adequately certify wire systems.

Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked to review § 25.1309, AC 25.1309-1A (or latest revision), corresponding JAR-25 material, and related ARAC recommendations. ATSRAC is then to submit a recommendation on whether particular methods of compliance with § 25.1309 should be mandated in the new wire systems rule. Particular methods include, but are not limited to:

  • common mode analysis
  • safety zonal analysis, and
  • particular risk analysis

The recommendation should consider how to address potential wiring failures and in-service conditions as contained in the ATSRAC recommendations from the Intrusive Inspection Report, as well as aging effects, as part of system safety assessments performed in compliance with § 25.1309.

TASK 6.7: Identify Requirements for Wire Separation

ATSRAC recommendations, as defined in the Intrusive Inspection Report, identified the enhancement of wire separation requirements as a mitigating factor against certain failure modes and conditions. Current FAA/JAA requirements for wire separation are contained in § 25.1353 ("Electrical equipment and installations"), and implied in § 25.1309. Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked to determine if a comprehensive wire separation regulation, in addition to § 25.1353, should be included in the new wire system rule. If so, the recommendations obtained from this task should include general requirements for all wire systems regarding wire separation. In responding to this task, ATSRAC should review:

  • existing FAA/JAA guidance
  • ATSRAC and ARAC recommendations
  • industry documentation for wire separation requirements and associated guidance

TASK 6.8: Identify Requirements for Wire Identification

Maintaining proper wire separation requires the need to adequately define the airplane-level effect of failure of the functions contained in any given wire bundle. In addition, it may be prudent to allow more detailed inspections of wire bundles that

  • contain wires associated with those systems required for continued safe flight and landing
  • contain wires, the failure of which would affect the ability of the flightcrew to cope with adverse operating conditions

Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked to provide recommendations on the need for the special identification of wire and/or wire bundles based on the airplane-level effect of failures of systems contained in a given wire bundle.

TASK 6.9: Recommend Advisory Material for the New Wire Systems Rule

Providing acceptable guidance with the new wire systems rule will facilitate compliance with the rule. Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked to provide recommended methods of compliance with the requirements established from TASKS 6.4 through 6.8, described above. Existing advisory material may already provide acceptable means of compliance. If so, ATSRAC is tasked to identify where this guidance exists.

In preparation for fulfilling this task, ATSRAC is also tasked to review the existing advisory material, guidelines, and policies regarding the design and installation of wiring systems, as well as related ARAC recommendations. ATSRAC will then recommend necessary changes, considering the aging effects on wiring as noted in the previous recommendations submitted by ATSRAC and, in particular, in the Intrusive Inspection Report.

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TASK 7

STANDARD WIRE PRACTICE MANUAL (SWPM)

The FAA's Aging Transport Non-Structural Systems Plan states that the current presentation and arrangement of standard wire practices make it difficult for an aircraft maintenance technician to locate and extract the pertinent and applicable data necessary to effect satisfactory repairs. The ATSRAC recommendations on the SWPM provided methods to facilitate using the SWPM.

This TASK 7 is intended to implement the previous ATSRAC recommendations on the SWPM.

TASK 7.1: Establish a Harmonization Working Group (HWG)

Through this tasking, the FAA intends to implement the ATSRAC Task Group 4 recommendations for a revised SWPM. The result of this tasking will be a recommendation from ATSRAC for a standardized SWPM. The FAA will use this recommendation to develop an AC that identifies the standardized structure of major sections for standard practices dealing with wire, cable, and other wiring components. Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked to establish a Standard Wire Practice Manual HWG. This HWG should consist of, as a minimum, representatives from:

  • the Air Transport Association (ATA)
  • operators
  • aircraft and component manufacturers
  • regulatory authorities

TASK 7.2: Coordination with other ATSRAC HWGs

In developing the report for SWPM format, the SWPM HWG must coordinate with:

  • the Wire System Certification HWG (addressing TASK 6)
  • the Enhanced Maintenance Practices for Systems HWG (addressing TASK 9)

Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked to develop a process for coordination between these working groups.

TASK 7.3: Define a Standard Format

ATSRAC is tasked with defining a standard format for the SWPM that meets the following characteristics:

  • The SWPM format and organization must provide operators of different aircraft types from different manufacturers the ability to retrieve standard wiring repair and maintenance information from the maintenance manual or wiring diagram manual.
  • The information and data format must be useable and readily retrievable by field level technicians who are performing the maintenance and repairs.
  • Human factor considerations must be taken into account when defining the structure of the manual, so that the potential for human error will been minimized in interpreting wiring practices information.
  • The structure of the manual also must allow inclusion of wiring repair and maintenance information supplied by component manufacturers [e.g., line replaceable units (LRU) and other types of system equipment], such that wiring repair and maintenance information for entire wiring systems (including both aircraft wiring and system/subsystem wiring) can be readily retrievable.
  • The structure and organization method must be developed to facilitate classification of wiring systems-related corrective action for reliability reporting.

TASK 7.4: Define Standard Content

ATSRAC is tasked with defining the minimum content for the SWPM. The minimum content will define standard categories to be included in the SWPM. It will not define the actual procedures associated with the standard content that is pertinent to each manufacturer. The standard content will include the characteristics described below. The technical content is to use source data from ATA Spec 117 and applicable FAA Advisory Circulars, and must address the following subjects, as a minimum:

Cleaning Requirements and Methods:

  • · "Protect, clean as you go" philosophy.
  • Non-destructive methods for cleaning dust, dirt, foreign object debris (FOD), lavatory fluid, and other contaminants produced by an aircraft environment from wiring systems.
  • Wire replacement guidelines when an accumulation of contaminants, either on the surface and/or imbedded in the wire bundle, cannot be safely removed.

Wire and Cable Identification.

  • Specify requirements for wire and cable identification and marking to provide safety of operation, safety to maintenance personnel, and ease of maintenance. (Refer to TASK 6, above.)
  • Specify methods of direct wire marking. Also, identify specific requirements and cautions associated with certain types of wire marking.

Wire and Cable Damage Limits.

  • Specify limits to positively identify the thresholds where damaged wire/cable replacement may be necessary and where repairs can be safely accomplished. Establish limits for each applicable wire/cable type, if necessary.
  • Include damage limits for terminals, studs, connectors, and other wiring system components, as necessary.

Installation Clamping and Routing Requirements.

  • Specify the requirements for the installation of wiring systems with respect to physical attachment to the aircraft structure. These requirements must be compatible with the different environments applicable to aircraft and aircraft systems.
  • Specify applicable methods of clamping, support, termination, and routing to facilitate installation, repair, and maintenance of wires, wire bundles, and cabling.
  • Establish minimum bend radii for different types of wire and cable.
  • Specify minimum clearance between wiring and other aircraft systems and aircraft structure.
  • Include the requirements for the installation of wiring conduit with respect to physical attachment, routing, bend radii, drain holes, and conduit end coverings.
  • Emphasize special wiring protective features, such as spatial separation, segregation, or shielding, that are required to be maintained throughout the life of the aircraft.

Repair and Replacement Procedures.

  • Describe methods to safely repair and/or replace wiring and wiring system components.
  • Include types and maximum numbers of splice repairs for wiring. When splicing wire, environmental splices are highly recommended over non-environmental splices. Guidance should be provided on how long a temporary splice may be left in the wire.
  • Specify procedures for the repair, replacement, and maintenance of connectors, terminals, modular terminal blocks, and other wiring components.

Inspection Methods.

  • In wiring inspection methods, include a general visual inspection (GVI), or a detailed inspection, as determined by the enhanced zonal analysis procedure. Typical damage includes heat damage, chafing, cracked insulation, arcing, insulation delamination, corrosion, broken wire or terminal, loose terminals, incorrect bend radii, contamination, and deteriorated repairs
  • Identify detailed inspections and, where applicable, established and emerging new technology non-destructive test methods to complement the visual inspection process.
  • Whenever possible, ensure that inspection methods can detect wiring problems without compromising the integrity of the installation.

TASK 7.5: Recommend Updates of Existing SWPMs.

ATSRAC is tasked to consider and make recommendations to the FAA on whether to update SWPMs already in use under existing airline and repair station programs. ATSRAC must provide adequate justification for their recommendations. If ATSRAC determines that existing manuals should be updated, the FAA requests that a proposed method and compliance schedule be included in the recommendation.

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TASK 8

ENHANCED TRAINING PROGRAM FOR WIRE SYSTEMS

Previous tasking to ATSRAC (TASK 5) resulted in recommendations regarding the need for the development of enhanced training programs regarding wire systems. The enhancements to the training programs will ensure that aging systems issues are adequately addressed.

TASK 8.1: Establish Harmonization Working Group (HWG)

To assist the FAA in formulating appropriate rulemaking and guidance pertaining to aircraft wiring training, ATSRAC is tasked to identify and appoint an Enhanced Training Program Harmonization Working Group (HWG). This HWG will assist the FAA in the development of a draft advisory circular (AC) and possible rulemaking actions concerning wire system training. Selected participants should have expertise in training program development, wiring, and avionics maintenance.

TASK 8.2: Coordination with Other ATSRAC HWGs

Because the training must reflect the enhanced maintenance requirements, ATSRAC is tasked to develop a process for coordination between:

  • the Enhanced Training Program HWG (addressing TASK 8)
  • the Enhanced Maintenance Practices HWG (addressing TASK 9)
  • the Standard Wire Practice Manual HWG (addressing TASK 7)
  • TASK 8.3: Develop Guidance for Wire System Training Program

ATSRAC is tasked to provide a recommended "Wire System Training Program" that could be incorporated into an FAA Advisory Circular and JAA Advisory Material. The Wire System Training Program should be applicable to:

  • air carrier operations
  • repair station programs
  • other operators of transport aircraft

Using the recommendations from the previous ATSRAC working group reports -- in particular, TASK 5, Training, and the Intrusive Inspection Report -- provide a Wire System Training Program that can be incorporated into advisory material. This program must consider training requirements that address all specific issues of an enhanced maintenance program identified under TASK 9, Enhanced Maintenance Criteria for Systems.

TASK 8.4: Identify SWPM Recurrent Training

To improve the usage of the SWPM/ESPM by maintenance technicians, ATSRAC previously recommended recurrent training on the SWPM. Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked to recommend minimum requirements for recurrent training of maintenance technicians for the SWPM, with particular focus on aging and degradation of wiring systems. Human factors considerations must be taken into account when developing recurrent training requirements, so that the potential for human error will be minimized in interpreting wiring practices training materials. The recurrent training requirements must use source data from ATA Spec 117 and applicable FAA Advisory Circulars, and include, as a minimum, the following subjects:

  • Safety - Stress the importance of proper installation, repair, and maintenance of wiring systems by describing the various consequences of wiring systems faults such as overheat, arcing damage, smoke, fire, and loss of systems. Consider the inclusion of actual service history events, incidents, and accidents.
  • Degradation of Wire Installations - Review the major factors influencing wire systems degradation, including improper installation, vibration, moisture, heat, contamination, and indirect damage from proximate systems.
  • Lightning/High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection - Describe the different types of bonding degradation as applicable to the lightning/HIRF protection schemes.
  • Corrosion of Components - Describe the causes and effects of wiring system corrosion including electrolysis, oxidation, and other forms of corrosion. List inspection methods and limits associated with visual or electrical corrosion detection.
  • Contamination - Describe types and effects of chemical and other contamination such as hydraulic fluids, fuels, solvents, cleaning fluids, and other caustic materials/fluids on wiring system components.
  • Accumulation of Dust, Lint, and Debris - Review the effects of dust, lint, and other debris material on wiring systems. Stress the importance of the effects on wiring insulation flammability characteristics that dust, lint, and other contaminants may pose. Emphasize the destructive effects that can occur on wire bundles that have been contaminated with aluminum shavings.
  • Damage Prevention and Cleaning - Highlight prevention as number one and "protect; clean as you go" philosophies to reduce potential for damage to wiring systems due to contamination. Review non-destructive methods of safely cleaning wiring systems from dust, dirt, FOD, lavatory fluids, and other contaminants typical of an aircraft environment. Discuss any established limits where heavy accumulation of contaminants cannot be safely removed, such that wire replacement is necessary. Emphasize the importance of periodic cleaning identified in post-EZAP maintenance program

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TASK 9

ENHANCED MAINTENANCE CRITERIA FOR SYSTEMS

As identified in the FAA's Aging Transport Non-Structural Systems Plan, maintenance procedures currently in use in the air transport industry may not adequately or proactively address aging non-structural systems. There is a need to define general criteria for maintenance and inspection activities that maintenance programs should exhibit to address aging systems issues. To ensure that aging systems issues are adequately addressed, enhancements are needed to:

  • the maintenance planning procedures
  • maintenance procedures
  • inspection procedures
  • inspection criteria
  • procedures for protection of systems during maintenance
  • maintenance training programs

These enhancements, when applied to a specific airplane type, should lead to the development of an airplane model-specific maintenance program that adequately addresses aging systems issues.

TASK 9.1: Establish a Harmonization Working Group (HWG)

To assist the FAA in formulating appropriate rulemaking and guidance pertaining to the enhancement of transport airplane maintenance program for systems, ATSRAC is tasked to identify and appoint an Enhanced Maintenance Practices HWG. This HWG will assist the FAA in the development of a draft advisory circular (AC) and possible rulemaking actions. Selected participants should have expertise in wiring/avionics maintenance and maintenance program development, and should have an understanding of how Instructions for Continued Airworthiness are used.

TASK 9.2: Coordination with Other ATSRAC HWGs

ATSRAC is tasked to develop a process for coordination between the Enhanced Maintenance Practices HWG (addressing this TASK 9) and the HWGs addressing TASKS 6, 7, and 8.

TASK 9.3: Develop Guidance for Enhanced Maintenance Criteria for Systems

As a result of the initial ATSRAC tasking, the Maintenance Criteria working group identified an enhancement to existing maintenance practices and logic methods that could be applied to in-service aircraft and new designs to ensure that adequate consideration is given to potential deterioration of system installations. The target was to develop a common process for old and new designs. The outcome was improved practices and an enhanced zonal analysis procedure.

These improvements include changes to maintenance practices such as:

  • Definitions of "general visual inspection (GVI)" and "detailed inspection (DET)"
  • expectations of a Zonal Inspection
  • handling of single element dual load path (SEDLP)
  • housekeeping culture issues

Application of the enhanced zonal analysis procedure (EZAP) permits appropriate attention to be given to wiring installations. Using this procedure, it is possible to select stand-alone visual inspections (either General or Detailed) and tasks to minimize the presence of combustible material. The outcome of the EZAP logic will be a model-specific Enhanced System Program. In addition, for those type designs that today do not have a MSG-3-derived zonal inspection program, the outcome will include a new or enhanced zonal inspection program.

To assist the FAA in formulating appropriate guidance for defining an acceptable maintenance program for systems, ATSRAC is tasked to provide recommendations for enhancing maintenance programs for systems. The recommended program must consider all the elements of the previous recommendations in the ATSRAC TASK 3 Report, including the EZAP. The recommended program must also consider the conclusions and recommendations of the other previously submitted ATSRAC recommendations, with a focus on those provided by the Intrusive Inspection Report. The outcome of the recommendations will be included in an FAA AC and JAA Advisory Circular Joint (ACJ).

The AC/ACJ should provide a basis for establishing an enhanced maintenance program that addresses aging systems issues. The AC must be directed toward those part 25 transport category aircraft currently being used in part(s) 91, 121, 125, and 129 operations. It should be understood that all potential users of the AC do not have maintenance or inspection programs developed under the auspices of a Maintenance Review Board (MRB) using the ATA MSG-3 process. Some users will be operating aircraft that have maintenance or inspection programs developed using earlier methodologies.


TASK 9.4: Assist in Development of a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) for Performance of the Enhanced Zonal Analysis Procedure (EZAP)

Performing the EZAP requires a thorough understanding of the wire system design and philosophy. The holders of type certificates (TC) and supplemental type certificates (STC) who install wiring are the technical experts that obtain this understanding. Their assistance in performing the EZAP is crucial.

In order to obtain this assistance, the FAA plans to issue an SFAR. The proposed SFAR will likely apply to TC holders, and STC holders who install wire bundles or significantly affect the installation of existing wiring. Under the proposed SFAR, these TC and STC holders will be required to develop an enhanced maintenance and inspection program based on the EZAP logic. The TC and STC holders will likely be required to augment the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness or maintenance instructions based on the EZAP logic.

Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked first to review pertinent recommendations of the ATSRAC Maintenance Practices (TASK 3) working group, particularly the "zonal analysis procedure" methodology contained in the final report. After this review, ATSRAC is to recommend the proposed contents of an SFAR to require the enhancement of existing maintenance and inspection programs based on the EZAP logic. The recommendation should contain appropriate SFAR timelines for aircraft type design holders to complete their application for the EZAP logic for each aircraft.

NOTE: The EZAP logic can be used by type design holders or airplane operators to enhance the maintenance programs of in-service type designs. This includes type designs currently being produced and type designs that are no longer in production.

The EZAP logic can also:

  • be used during the development of maintenance programs for new aircraft type designs
  • be applied to previously installed STCs, either by the STC holder or the airplane owner or operator

The holder of a design approval, including either the TC or sSTC for an airplane for which the application was made after January 28, 1981, should supplement the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness (ICA) based on the EZAP logic, and provide the current airplane owner or operator with those ICA's

The holder of a design approval, including either the TC or STC for an airplane for which the application was made prior to January 28, 1981, should supplement any maintenance instructions provided with the issuance of the original TC or STC based on the EZAP logic, and provide the current airplane owner or operator with those maintenance instructions.

TASK 9.5: Recommend Wire System Instructions for Continued Airworthiness

Previous recommendations from ATSRAC have shown that improper maintenance, repair, and modifications often accelerate the "aging" of wire systems. To properly maintain, repair, and modify airplane wiring, certain data must be available to the designer, engineer, and installer. This data should be part of the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness as required by § 25.1529 ("Instructions for Continued Airworthiness"). Therefore, ATSRAC is tasked to provide comment and recommendation for inclusion of the following items in Appendix H to part 25, Instructions for Continued Airworthiness:

  • Standard Wire Practices data, as improved under ATSRAC TASK 7
  • Wire Separation Design Guidelines
  • Special Identification Requirements
  • Electrical Load Analysis
  • Enhanced Zonal Analysis Procedure (EZAP

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TASK 10

Small Transport Airplane Harmonization Working Group

This notice informs the public of the formation of one additional ATSRAC harmonization working group, the Small Transport Airplane Harmonization Working Group. The ATSRAC has chosen to establish a new harmonization working group to provide technical support in developing its recommendations to the FAA. This group will establish working methods to ensure coordination among the four existing groups and coordination with working groups established by the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee. This coordination is required to ensure efficient use of resources, continuity in related decisions, and the reduction of duplication of effort.

New Harmonization Working Group and Assigned Tasks

The Small Transport Airplane Harmonization Working Group should be comprised of persons who have expertise in small aircraft (i.e., aircraft with 6-30 passenger seats and a maximum payload capacity of 7,500 pounds or less) design, maintenance, or operations. The group will—

  1. Investigate the applicability of previous ATSRAC recommendations to small transport airplane electrical wire systems
  2. Identify issues unique to these systems and recommend appropriate actions based on results from
    • Performing a sample inspection of in-service and retired small transport airplanes that correlate to the inspection previously performed under the original task 1 and task 2 of the ATSRAC;
    • Reviewing fleet-service history to identify trends or areas for action; and
    • Coordinating with other ATSRAC Harmonization Working Groups to ensure that the ATSRAC reports to the FAA consider the needs of small transport airplanes.

The working group will serve as staff to the ATSRAC to assist the Committee in writing technical reports that will allow the FAA to complete its development of associated rulemaking language and advisory material. Working group documents will be reviewed, deliberated, and approved by the ATSRAC. If the ATSRAC accepts the working group’s documents, the Committee will forward them to the FAA as ATSRAC recommendations.

In addition to coordinating with other working groups, the Small Transport Airplane Harmonization Working Group should coordinate with various organizations and specialists, as appropriate. And, if the group identifies a need for new working groups, when existing groups do not have the appropriate expertise to address certain tasks, it should inform the Committee.

Working Group Activity

The working group is expected to comply with the procedures adopted by ATSRAC. As part of the procedures, the working group is expected to:

  1. Recommend a work plan for completion of the task, including the rationale supporting such a plan, for consideration by the ATSRAC, following the establishment and selection of the working group.
  2. Give a detailed conceptual presentation of proposed recommendations prior to proceeding with the work stated in item 3 below.
  3. Draft a report and/or any other collateral documents the working group determines to be appropriate and submit them to the ATSRAC for review and approval by January 2003.
  4. Provide a status report at each meeting of the ATSRAC.

Participation in the Working Group

The working group will be composed of experts having an interest in the assigned tasks. Participants in the working group should be prepared to devote a significant portion of their time to the ATSRAC task through January 2003. A working group member need not be a representative or a member of the ATSRAC.

The Secretary of Transportation has determined that the formation and use of ATSRAC are necessary and in the public interest in connection with the performance of duties imposed on the FAA by law.

Meetings of the ATSRAC will be open to the public. Meetings of the individual working groups will not be open to the public, except to the extent those individuals with an interest and expertise are selected to participate. No public announcement of working group meetings will be made.

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Background

In response to the White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security, the FAA formed the Aging Non-Structural Systems Study Team, to develop the FAA’s approach to improving management of aging wire systems. To help fulfill the actions specified in the Aging Non-Structural Systems Plan, the FAA set up an Aging Transport Systems Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ATSRAC) to give recommendations on airplane system safety issues.

In 1998, the FAA assigned five tasks to the ATSRAC. These tasks included collecting data on aging wiring systems through airplane inspections, reviewing airplane manufacturers’ service information, reviewing operators’ maintenance programs, and providing the FAA with recommendations to enhance the safety of those systems. The FAA held a public meeting on January 20, 1999, to discuss the Committee’s operations and their assigned tasks. The ATSRAC found that problems associated with systems on aging airplanes are not entirely related to the degradation overtime of wire systems. The review of these systems also found inadequate installation and maintenance practices could lead to what is commonly referred to as an ‘‘aging system’’ problem. Therefore, the scope of the ATSRAC’s work includes, not only age-related issues, but also involves improving the continued airworthiness of airplane systems (i.e., wire systems).

The FAA accepted the ATSRAC recommendations from the first five tasks and subsequently assigned five additional tasks to get the Committee’s help in implementing the safety enhancements from their earlier recommendations. The FAA is now considering the ATSRAC recommendations on the second set of tasks. These recommendations include rulemaking and other actions. Implementation of the ATSRAC recommendations is a major part of the FAA’s Enhanced Airworthiness Program for Airplane Systems (EAPAS), a program that addresses the safety of wiring systems.

The FAA recognizes the knowledge and experience the ATSRAC provides. Because ATSRAC members represent a large cross-section of industry, they will supply the FAA with an invaluable resource of technical expertise in a variety of areas. Therefore, the FAA has assigned three new tasks to the ATSRAC to help carry out the EAPAS objectives. This notice announces the new tasks, which the ATSRAC has accepted. These tasks will allow the FAA to get the Committee’s continuing help to carry out their recommendations. ATSRAC has chosen to form harmonization working groups (HWG) to provide technical support to develop their recommendations on these tasks. A discussion of the new tasks and harmonization working groups (HWG) follows.

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SPECIFIC TASK 11

EAPAS Rulemaking Advisory HWG

To promote efficient rulemaking and compliance with this rulemaking, the FAA tasks ATSRAC to provide, when specifically sought by the FAA, recommendations about the issues discussed in items I–1 through I–3 of this section. The ATSRAC Executive Director will send each FAA task to the ATSRAC Chair to obtain the ATSRAC members’ decision on whether to accept the FAA’s assigned task.

I–1. Alternatives to Rulemaking The rulemaking process requires agencies to explore alternatives to rulemaking. Such alternatives may include taking voluntary (or nonmandated) action or taking no action. Under Task I–1, the FAA may request recommendations from the ATSRAC on how to carry out alternatives, which the FAA considers reasonable, to rulemaking. This would include providing an estimate of the resulting improvement to safety. The FAA may also request recommendations on how to measure implementation of the alternative actions and how the FAA can best support these actions.

I–2. Technical and Economic Data Questions may arise during rulemaking where added technical and economic data are needed. This may include the need for such information to prepare responses to public comments on a proposed rule.

I–3. Disposition of Comments from an EAPAS Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) Under Task I–3, the FAA may request the ATSRAC’s help in dispositioning any comments the FAA might receive in response to an NPRM. Such support may include the ATSRAC’s review of the FAA’s prepared disposition of comments.

On May 28, 2003 tasking to ATSRAC by the FAA was formally provided in accordance with previous acceptance of these tasks. Included in this tasking, ATSRAC was requested to provide recommendations to the FAA to extend their advise during the FAA rulemaking process. Such recommendations would only be provided when specifically asked for by the FAA.

As part of a complete rulemaking program, alternatives to rulemaking should be explored. Alternatives to rulemaking that an agency might take could be, for example, advocating voluntary accomplishment of the recommended actions, without mandate, or taking no action at all. When an alternative seems reasonable, the FAA may request recommendations from ATSRAC on how to implement that alternative and an estimate of the resulting improvement to safety. The FAA would also request recommendations on how to measure implementation of the actions and how the FAA could best support the alternative actions.

During the development of the EAPAS NPRM the FAA has concluded that implementation of the full suite of ATSRAC recommendations was not the most cost/beneficial action. Certain components of the ATSRAC recommendations determined not to be mandated were the recommendation associated with EWIS training and extension of the EZAP applicability to STC applicants. Even though the FAA is not currently planning to mandate these aspects of the recommendations it does not diminish the significant safety enhancements that they could provide.

Training

To that end the FAA is requesting that ATSRAC provide recommendations on how best to implement the training recommendations provided by ATSRAC. The EAPAS rulemaking is currently proposing to require changes to an air carriers maintenance program. The operating rules indirectly will require certain portions of the training recommendations associated with the changes to the maintenance program to be implemented.

Given the above, ATSRAC is requested to provide recommendations consistent with the following tasks:

Task 11.1.1

In accordance with the changes to an air carriers maintenance program as defined in the ATSRAC Task 9 Final Report, dated July 15, 2002, please identify the minimum set of training requirements to support these changes. The minimum set of training requirements should be based on the recommendations as identified in the ATSRAC Task 8 Final Report, dated August 2, 2002. The recommendation is intended to assist in the implementation of proposed rulemaking as defined at the ATSRAC July 10, 2003 meeting. This task is to be completed by October 31, 2004.

Task 11.1.2

Under this tasking ATSRAC is requested to provide recommendations that will facilitate voluntary implementation of the remaining training recommendations of the ATSRAC Task 8 Final Report not implicitly mandated as described under Task 11.1. To accomplish this task ATSRAC is requested to consider the following items:

  • Method for documentation and implementation into an air carriers training program
  • Method for documentation and implementation into a repair station training program
  • Regulatory Authority support needed
  • Other programs where implementation can be concurrent
  • Identification of metrics and process to measure success
  • Schedule for implementation
  • Other items that ATSRAC determines necessary

In accordance with the July 10, 2003 EAPAS rulemaking program presentation given to ATSRAC, the FAA identified the intent of proposing that holders of type certificates (TC) make changes to existing Instructions for Continued Airworthiness (ICA) based on an enhanced zonal inspection process for wiring systems. ATSRAC has developed the Enhanced Zonal Analysis Procedure (EZAP) that is intended to assist TC holders in developing the changes to the ICAs.

The FAA has determined that requiring Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) holders to update their ICAs based on an enhanced zonal inspection process for wiring systems would result in a rulemaking package that exceeds the cost/benefit goal. The majority of STCs will not likely cause a revision to the inspections and intervals developed by the TC holders for their type designs. STCs installations do not typically add wiring in a zone where wiring did not already exist on the type design, nor do their installations significantly increase the density in a zone.

However, for those cases where this is not true, maintenance tasks identified through application of EZAP on a type design may no longer be adequate to assess the health of the wiring systems in a zone. Therefore, an air carrier may need to make adjustments to their maintenance program beyond those identified by the TC holder. This task is to be completed by January 31, 2005.

Supplemental Type Certificates

Given the above, ATSRAC is requested to provide recommendations consistent with the following task:

Task 11.2

Development of adequate maintenance tasks for an air carrier may necessitate analysis of the wiring systems installed by the way of an STC. STC holders may not be required to provide the results of an EZAP analysis, or similar, on their STCs. Therefore, ATSRAC is requested to provide a recommendation that would facilitate development of appropriate maintenance tasks associated with STC installations and how an air carrier might implement them into its maintenance program. This task is to be completed by July 31, 2004.

To complete this task please consider the following items:

  • Identification of types or categories of STCs that would require additional or revised inspections or intervals as compared to those developed by the type design holder
  • Method to integrate STC related maintenance and inspection tasks with the TC holder developed tasks
  • Most appropriate means to include Passenger to Freighter Conversion STCs in accordance with the intent of the ATSRAC recommendations
  • Other items that ATSRAC determines necessary

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SPECIFIC TASK 12

Electrical Wiring Interconnection Systems (EWIS) Research and Development (R&D) Technology Transfer HWG

In the past, the FAA has provided quarterly reviews of their research and development program to the ATSRAC. These reviews have resulted in a useful exchange of information and in the formation of research partnerships and other cooperative research. As the EAPAS program continues, it would be helpful to have the ATSRAC explore FAA and other R&D products and results that may be valuable to the aviation industry. As appropriate, the FAA will seek the ATSRAC’s help in—

  • Developing strategies for technology transfer to the aviation community in a manner that optimizes their transfer and optimizes the benefits resulting from their transfer; and
  • Achieving optimal compliance with existing and anticipated FAA electrical systems rules. To achieve the two R&D objectives, the HWG would complete the following tasks:

II–1. Develop effective strategies to transfer and set up, in the aviation community, R&D products. This includes providing recommendations for the best way to carry out these goals (e.g., through rulemaking, advisory circulars, or other means).

II–2. Review and screen FAA and other R&D products (e.g., R&D prototypes), as appropriate, and devise strategies to further develop these products into commercially viable tools that support the two R&D objectives referenced in this section. Such strategies may include recommendations for added FAA research and development; however, the strategies should mainly address industry activity to achieve a desired end product.

II–3. Explore opportunities to promote cooperative efforts and partnerships valuable to achieving the two R&D objectives.

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SPECIFIC TASK 13

Small Transport Airplane Enhanced Wiring Inspection HWG

Small Transport Airplane Enhanced Wiring Inspection HWG Criteria for upgrading and developing enhanced wiring inspection procedures should be developed for use by manufacturers of small transport airplanes. These criteria should be based on the results of previously conducted inspections and tests and recommendations from ATSRAC.

The tasks for this HWG are as follows:

III–1. Review existing small transport airplane manufacturers’ wiring inspection procedures.

III–2. Identify and prepare, as necessary, criteria for upgrading and developing enhanced procedures for inspection, cleaning, reduction of combustible material (e.g., lint and chemical contamination), reduction of potential ignition sources (e.g., cracked wiring), and maintenance of the electrical wiring interconnection systems (EWIS) on small transport airplanes.

III–3. Develop and recommend compliance means to adopt the criteria referenced in III–2 and incorporate the enhanced wiring inspection procedures in operators’ maintenance programs.

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